Thai Law Is Arbitrary?

The decision to deny former PetroSaudi International employee Andre Xavier Justo his request to serve the remainder of his jail term in his country, Switzerland, was made “in accordance with Thai law”.

According to Thai Justice Minister Gen Paiboon Koomchaya, under the country’s law, anyone requesting to transfer the remainder of his jail sentence must have “not less than one year” left in his jail term.

“But the remainder of the jail term of this prisoner (Justo) is nine months, which did not meet the transfer (of prisoner) treaty law. Thus, the decision to deny the request.”

“This law does not discriminate against anyone, and is effective for every prisoner who is eligible for the transfer. The Correctional Department’s decision is in accordance with the rule of law,” he told Bernama in a telephone interview today.

Our comment

Unfortunately, the rest of the world is coming to the conclusion that Thai law is arbitrary.

First, an ‘amnesty’ reduces a sentence and promises are made that a prisoner will be released home.

Then (following meetings with Najib who wants this witness silenced) there is a u-turn and now an announcement that the reduction in the term has  actually EXTENDED the time the hostage remains in Thailand.

Xavier Justo was convicted on the basis of a forced, false confession, taken under conditions of blackmail in his jail by a paid agent of PetroSaudi, whom the Thai legal system had apparently allowed to usurp their due process.

Justo was denied his lawyer present and told if he cooperated in making this confession, then PetroSaudi would get him out.

Under which Thai law was this permitted?

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